THE CONTRACEPTIVE SPONGE - #MYCONTRACEPTION
Sponge

THE SPONGE

A SPERMICIDAL SOLUTION.

ACTIVATE WITH WATER

The sponge is a small disc of latex foam that contains spermicide and is placed against the cervix to prevent pregnancy. It can be left inside the vagina for up to 24 hours, making it perfect for spontaneous but uninterrupted sex. While many find the sponge a convenient method of contraception, it isn't suitable for everyone – particularly women who have given birth.
To use the sponge, simply wash your hands and dampen the sponge with tap water. This is an important step, because it starts the release of the spermicide. Now, with the dimple facing up, fold the sponge in half and place it as far as it will go, until it covers your cervix. Check the edges to make sure it's fitted properly, and you're good to go. After sex, leave it in for at least six hours, and then simply pull on the strap to remove it and throw it away. It is important to remove the sponge within 30 hours, as in some cases it can raise the risk of toxic shock syndrome.

Sponge

HOW IT MEASURES UP

HORMONES

No. The sponge is hormone-free, and it continuously releases spermicide.

EASE OF USE

The sponge needs to be placed in the vagina prior to intercourse, and can be placed up to 24 hours in advance.

YOUR PERIOD

The sponge has no impact on menstruation.

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HAVE MORE QUESTIONS?

Make an appointment with your doctor or nurse today.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

1
DAY

How long the sponge offers protection.

76%

The overall rate at which the sponge is effective with typical use.

1976

The year the Today sponge was created by Bruce Ward Vorhauer.

  • It’s self-administered and used on demand.
  • It’s hormone-free and can be an option for women who experience unwanted effects from hormones.
  • It can be used when breastfeeding.
  • Placing and removing the sponge can take practice.
  • It requires careful tracking of the hours it is used, because it must be left in place for six hours after sex, but not more than 24 hours in total.
  • It may not be suitable for women who have given birth.
  • It doesn’t protect against HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

NEED ADVICE? SPEAK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL.

Seek out an appointment with your doctor or nurse for further support that meets your needs.

Is It Okay?

CONSIDER THIS

This approach is entirely self-directed, and requires a lot of planning and tracking. Those who wish to avoid unplanned pregnancy should use a hormone-free barrier method when ovulating, or if menstrual cycles are irregular. For protection from STIs, condoms must be used.

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