THE DIAPHRAGM - #MYCONTRACEPTION
Diaphragm

THE DIAPHRAGM

BLOCKING ACCESS TO SPERM UP TO 24 HOURS IN ADVANCE.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE FIT

The diaphragm is a simple barrier that stops sperm from reaching the womb. It is a dome-shaped flexible disc with a flexible rim, and is made from latex rubber or silicone. It must be placed into the vagina before you have sex. Wash your hands, fill the diaphragm with spermicide, and add some around the edges to be safe. Then fold it in half and place it as you would place a tampon, pushing it up until it covers your cervix.
The great thing about the diaphragm is that you can be organized or last minute. It can be left in place for up to 24 hours, but if you have sex more than once you should apply more spermicide. You should also leave the diaphragm in for at least six hours after sex. Your doctor or nurse may conduct an initial fitting to make sure you have the correct size, but after that it's up to you. Other than making sure it is placed properly, you should also check it from time to time to make sure it isn't damaged. You should also have the diaphragm checked by a doctor or nurse after childbirth, or if you lose a significant amount of weight, just to make sure it still fits correctly.

Diaphragm

HOW IT MEASURES UP

HORMONES

No. The diaphragm is hormone-free and works best when it is used with spermicide.

EASE OF USE

The diaphragm needs to be placed in the vagina up to 24 hours prior to intercourse each time you have sex, and it must be left in place for at least six hours after you have sex.

YOUR PERIOD

The diaphragm has no impact on menstruation.

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HAVE MORE QUESTIONS?

Make an appointment with your doctor or nurse today.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

24

The number of hours the diaphragm can be worn at a time.

1882

The year in which Dr. C. Hasse (pseudonym Wilhelm Mesinga) is credited with inventing the diaphragm.

6

How many hours the diaphragm must stay in place after intercourse.

  • It’s self-administered and used on demand.
  • It can be used when breastfeeding.
  • It is hormone-free and can be an option for women who experience unwanted effects from hormones.
  • It should be used with spermicide to be most effective.
  • A doctor or nurse should do an initial fitting, and self-administering a diaphragm can take a bit of practice.  
  • It may not be suitable for women who have given birth.
  • Some women experience irritation, allergic reactions, and urinary tract infections, and if left in place for more than 24 hours there is a risk of toxic shock syndrome.
  • It doesn’t protect against HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

NEED ADVICE? SPEAK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL.

Seek out an appointment with your doctor or nurse for further support that meets your needs.

Is It Okay?

CONSIDER THIS

Your diaphragm must cover your cervix fully to work. If you feel your diaphragm doesn’t fit properly, consult your doctor or nurse. They will be able to advise about the correct fit. In the meantime, consider using an alternative method of contraception such as a condom

KNOW YOUR OPTIONS

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