Patch

THE PATCH

THE STICK-ON SOLUTION.

SETTLE INTO A WEEKLY ROUTINE

The patch looks just like a shiny plaster. It sticks to the skin and releases hormones – both a progestin and estrogen – that enter the bloodstream through the skin. The hormones stop the ovaries from releasing eggs, and also thicken the cervical mucus to make it more difficult for sperm to move.
You simply peel off the back of the patch and apply it directly to your skin – on your lower abdomen, buttocks, upper arm, or even your back. You wear it for a week and then replace it with a new one. After 3 weeks you take a week off, and during that week where you don't wear the patch, your period should start. Then you repeat that routine. If your patch becomes loose or falls off while you are wearing it, you should refer to the Patient Information Booklet that came with it, or consult your doctor or nurse.

Patch

HOW IT MEASURES UP

HORMONES

Yes. The patch continuously releases hormones – estrogen and a progestin – throughout the entire body.

EASE OF USE

The patch needs to be changed weekly in order to be fully effective.

YOUR PERIOD

The patch may cause disrupted periods, either in the form of irregular bleeding, or regular, lighter periods.

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HAVE MORE QUESTIONS?

Make an appointment with your doctor or nurse today.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

1
PER WEEK

How frequently you need to change the patch three weeks out of every month.

21
DAYS

How long you use the patch every month in total.

2
HORMONES

Progestin and estrogen are continuously released directly through the skin.

  • It’s self-administered.
  • It requires tracking of the number of weeks it has been used, and must be changed on time to be most effective.
  • Allows spontaneity and doesn’t interrupt sex.
  • Most women find it easy to use.
  • It requires tracking of the number of weeks it has been used, and must be changed on time to be most effective.
  • It is visible, and there is a chance it can come loose or fall off, which affects its effectiveness.
  • Some women experience headaches, mood swings, and itching and redness at the application site.
  • It does not protect against HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

NEED ADVICE? SPEAK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL.

Seek out an appointment with your doctor or nurse for further support that meets your needs.

Is It Okay?

CONSIDER THIS

It’s a common fear women have when contemplating an IUS. However, your doctor or nurse will give you more information on placement pain and measures to minimize it. 

LEARN MORE

KNOW YOUR OPTIONS

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