IUD

THE IUD – AKA THE COPPER COIL

GOOD FOR THE LONG TERM, AND IN AN EMERGENCY.

AN IONIC CHOICE

The intrauterine device (IUD) is a small, T-shaped device that contains a copper thread. Also known as the copper coil, instead of hormones it releases copper ions that immobilize sperm and stop them from fertilizing the egg. Should a sperm manage to get through, the copper also prevents a fertilized egg from implanting in the womb lining, so you're still protected against pregnancy.
As no contraception method is for everyone, it's important to discuss the copper coil with your doctor or nurse first. Once you've decided an IUD is the right contraception method for you however, there's not much more for you to do. Your doctor or nurse will place it for you, and it will remain effective for up to 5 to 10 years. Once removed, fertility quickly returns to normal.

IUD

HOW IT MEASURES UP

HORMONES

No. The IUD releases no hormones, and instead uses copper ions to prevent pregnancy.

EASE OF USE

The IUD is placed in the womb by a doctor or nurse, and lasts for up to five to 10 years.

YOUR PERIOD

Women with an IUD may experience heavier and longer bleeding with cramps.

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HAVE MORE QUESTIONS?

Make an appointment with your doctor or nurse today.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

5-10
YEARS

Up to a decade of protection once fitted.

<120
HOURS

The window of time an IUD can be placed when using as emergency contraception.

168
MILLION

The number of women worldwide using IUDs.

  • It can stay in place for up to five or 10 years, but can be removed at any time.
  • Allows spontaneity and doesn’t interrupt sex.
  • Can be used as emergency contraception if placed within five days of unprotected sex.
  • Is hormone-free and can be an option for women who experience effects from hormones.
  • Fertility returns to normal once the IUD is removed.
  • A doctor or nurse must perform the placement and removal.
  • Some women experience cramps, irregular bleeding, headaches, tenderness, or acne after placement.
  • There is a small risk the IUD can be pushed out of place and become less effective
  • Doesn’t protect against HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
  • Some women experience longer periods with heavier menstrual bleeding and pain.

NEED ADVICE? SPEAK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL.

Seek out an appointment with your doctor or nurse for further support that meets your needs.

Is It Okay?

KNOW YOUR OPTIONS

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