Ring

THE RING

AN ALL-ROUND CONTRACEPTIVE SOLUTION.

RINGING TRUE

The contraception ring looks simple and functional, but there’s more to it than that. It's made from a soft, flexible plastic and, once placed, it slowly releases a progestin and estrogen into the body. The hormones stop the ovaries from releasing eggs, and thicken the cervical mucus to make it harder for sperm to move. You wear it for three weeks then you remove it, take a week off, and then put a new ring in.
The ring sits up against your vaginal wall, so putting it in is just the same as placing a tampon. After washing your hands you simply squeeze it and push it inside your vagina until it's sitting against the side of your vaginal wall. Once it is comfortably in position, that's it for three weeks. At the end of three weeks you take it out and have a week off – in this week your period should start. Then after a week of not wearing the ring, you simply start the routine again.
You should use another form of contraception if the ring falls out and stays out for more than three hours before you refit it. If the ring falls out and is out for less than three hours, simply refit it and continue as normal. Once the ring has been in place for seven consecutive days, it is effective again. If you're unsure about how to properly use the ring, consult your doctor or nurse.

Ring

HOW IT MEASURES UP

HORMONES

Yes. The ring releases a low dose of progestin and estrogen.

EASE OF USE

The ring needs to be left in placed in the vagina for three weeks. It is removed during the fourth week, before being replaced at the start of another four-week cycle.

YOUR PERIOD

The ring may cause temporary irregular bleeding, and some contraceptive rings can stop menstruation altogether.

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HAVE MORE QUESTIONS?

Make an appointment with your doctor or nurse today.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

OVER
40 YEARS

Doctors and scientists have been researching this method.

3
WEEKS

The amount of time the ring is worn during one cycle.

ONLY
1%...

Chance of pregnancy when used perfectly.

  • It can stay in place for up to three weeks.
  • It requires careful tracking of the number of weeks it has been used.
  • Some women experience vaginal discharge, discomfort, headaches, mood swings, weight gain and disrupted periods.
  • It does not protect against HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

NEED ADVICE? SPEAK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL.

Seek out an appointment with your doctor or nurse for further support that meets your needs.

Is It Okay?

CONSIDER THIS

If you’re concerned that your ring may fall out or has fallen out for more than three hours, you should consult your doctor or nurse and read your Patient Information Leaflet. In the meantime, consider using another form of contraception such as a condom.

KNOW YOUR OPTIONS

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