Female Condom

THE FEMALE CONDOM

A TWIST ON A CLASSIC.

ONE SIZE FITS ALL

The female condom works in much the same way as the male condom – the main difference is who’s wearing it. While a male condom is rolled over the erect penis, the female condom is slipped inside the vagina where it creates a thin, yet lubricated, polyurethane barrier that stops sperm from reaching the cervix. It also protects against STIs, and requires no hormones or additional contraceptive methods to work.
Like all condoms, you need to use a new one each time you have sex. The female condom has a ring at the closed end, which keeps it in place inside the vagina. To put the condom in, simply squeeze that flexible ring and place the condom as you would place a tampon. Push it in as far as you can – the closed end should cover the cervix and the open end should hang a couple of centimeters outside your vagina. After you've had sex, carefully grab the open end, twist to close it, and carefully remove the condom without spilling anything. Then simply throw it away and make sure you have a new condom for the next time.

Female Condom

HOW IT MEASURES UP

HORMONES

No. The female condom is hormone-free.

EASE OF USE

The female condom needs to be placed in the vagina prior to intercourse. A new one must be used each time you have sex.

YOUR PERIOD

The female condom has no impact on menstruation.

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HAVE MORE QUESTIONS?

Make an appointment with your doctor or nurse today.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

1-3
MILLIMETER

The cervix’s tiny opening makes it impossible for the female condom to disappear inside your body.

25.8
MILLION

The number of female condoms provided through international and nongovernmental funding sources in 2009.

ZERO

Like male condoms, the female condom is hormone free.

  • It’s self-administered and used on demand.
  • It can be used when breastfeeding.
  • It is hormone-free and can be an option for women who experience unwanted effects from hormones.
  • It provides protection against HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
  • Can be used with spermicides to increase effectiveness.
  • Using a female condom can take some practice.
  • It can tear if not placed properly.
  • Some people experience allergic reactions to latex condoms.

NEED ADVICE? SPEAK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL.

Seek out an appointment with your doctor or nurse for further support that meets your needs.

Is It Okay?

KNOW YOUR OPTIONS

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