THE CONTRACEPTIVE INJECTION - #MYCONTRACEPTION
Injection

THE CONTRACEPTIVE INJECTION

ONE SHOT TO COVER YOU FOR UP TO THREE MONTHS.

IT JUST TAKES A MOMENT

The contraceptive injection is a shot of hormones – either a progestin alone, or a progestin and estrogen – that stop the ovaries from releasing eggs and thicken the cervical mucus to make it harder for sperm to move. It works much in the same way as other hormonal contraception methods, such as the pill, except one shot will have an effect for one or three months, depending on the type. This means, however, that its effects are not reversible once it has been administered. Once you have decided that the contraceptive injection is right for you, your doctor or nurse will administer it. All you have to do is remember to return on time to get the next shot, either every month or every three months, to make sure the injection is at its most effective. If and when you want to return to fertility, it’s worth consulting your doctor or nurse as it may be some time before you can get pregnant.

Injection

HOW IT MEASURES UP

HORMONES

Yes. The contraceptive injection contains hormones that are released throughout the entire body.

EASE OF USE

The contraceptive injection is effective for three months, but it’s important to get the shot on time to maintain its efficacy.

YOUR PERIOD

The contraceptive injection may cause irregular bleeding. In some cases it may cause shorter, lighter periods, or no periods at all.

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HAVE MORE QUESTIONS?

Make an appointment with your doctor or nurse today.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

10

The number of countries in which over half of all women use the injection as their main contraceptive.

>2
YEARS

Bone density can be lost after consecutive years of use.

UP TO
1 YEAR

The amount of time it can take for fertility to return.

  • It’s effective for eight to thirteen weeks.
  • Allows spontaneity and doesn’t interrupt sex.
  • It requires tracking of the number of weeks it has been used, and must be administered on time to be most effective.
  • Some women experience headaches, mood swings, and itching and redness at the application site.
  • It does not protect against HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

NEED ADVICE? SPEAK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL.

Seek out an appointment with your doctor or nurse for further support that meets your needs.

Is It Okay?

CONSIDER THIS

It’s not uncommon to be fearful about having a needle. But as the injection must be re-administered monthly or quarterly, this contraceptive is best for individuals who are comfortable with committing to the procedure. 

CONSIDER THIS

This approach is entirely self-directed, and requires a lot of planning and tracking. Those who wish to avoid unplanned pregnancy should use a hormone-free barrier method when ovulating, or if menstrual cycles are irregular. For protection from STIs, condoms must be used.

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KNOW YOUR OPTIONS

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