SPERMICIDE - #MYCONTRACEPTION
Spermicide

SPERMICIDE

THE ADDED EXTRA.

DOESN’T ACT ALONE

Spermicides aren't very effective when used on their own, and are best combined with a barrier method such as a condom or a diaphragm. There are many different types available, from foams to creams and pastes, but they all work in much the same way. Chemicals in spermicides make it difficult for sperm to move in the vagina.
Since spermicides are best used with another form of contraception, the directions on how to use them will depend on the barrier method they are applied to. The important thing is to pay close attention to the spermicide's expiry date, and to leave it in the vagina for at least 6 hours after you've had sex. Some women experience allergic reactions or irritation caused by the chemicals in spermicide, so if you have any questions or concerns about spermicide, consult your doctor or nurse.

Spermicide

HOW IT MEASURES UP

HORMONES

No. Spermicide is hormone-free, but does contain chemicals.

EASE OF USE

Spermicide needs to be applied prior to intercourse, each time you have sex.

YOUR PERIOD

Spermicide has no impact on menstruation.

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HAVE MORE QUESTIONS?

Make an appointment with your doctor or nurse today.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

5-90
MINUTES

How soon before sex spermicide should be placed in the vagina.

1906

The year that the first spermicidal jelly was invented by Friedrich Merz.

ALWAYS
+1

Spermicides work best when used in conjunction with a diaphragm, cervical cap or condom.

  • It’s hormone-free and can be an option for women who experience unwanted effects from hormones.
  • It’s self-administered and used on demand.
  • It can be used with barrier methods such as the female condom or the diaphragm to increase effectiveness.
  • It’s not an effective method of contraception when used on its own.
  • Some women may experience irritation, allergic reactions and urinary tract infections.
  • It may not be effective if used at the same time as vaginal yeast infection medicine.
  • It doesn’t protect against HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

NEED ADVICE? SPEAK TO YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL.

Seek out an appointment with your doctor or nurse for further support that meets your needs.

Is It Okay?

KNOW YOUR OPTIONS

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